The Little Vegan


Savannah // Brisbane AU // twenty-five

“We must learn empathy. We must learn to see into the eyes of an animal and feel that their life has value, because they are alive.”

"Let food be thy medicine and medicine be thy food."

Currently: studying Nutrition Science at Queensland University of Technology.

I hope you enjoy my blog.

For the Animals
For the Planet
For your Health
Creamy Potato, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Leek & Pinenut Soup
Potato
Cauliflower
Broccoli
Leek
Red onion
Garlic
Zucchini
Squash
Thyme
Pinenuts
Massel’s vegetable powder
Olive oil
Olive or truffle oil to garnish
Water
Salt & pepper
In a large pot, saute onion, garlic, and leek until soft.
Add all other veggies (I essentially just used what I had in my fridge), vegetable powder (2-3 heaped tsp, or to taste), thyme, and enough water to cover your veggies. Simmer covered on medium/low until veggies are soft and falling apart.
Blend soup and pinenuts into a smooth, creamy consistency.
Add salt and pepper to taste.
Serve with toasted crusty bread and nuttlex (or other vegan butter alternative).
Garnish with olive or truffle oil for extra deliciousness.

Creamy Potato, Cauliflower, Broccoli, Leek & Pinenut Soup

  1. In a large pot, saute onion, garlic, and leek until soft.
  2. Add all other veggies (I essentially just used what I had in my fridge), vegetable powder (2-3 heaped tsp, or to taste), thyme, and enough water to cover your veggies. Simmer covered on medium/low until veggies are soft and falling apart.
  3. Blend soup and pinenuts into a smooth, creamy consistency.
  4. Add salt and pepper to taste.
  5. Serve with toasted crusty bread and nuttlex (or other vegan butter alternative).
  6. Garnish with olive or truffle oil for extra deliciousness.
6 days ago
10 notes | Reblog

Eat For Health: Australian Dietary Guidelines (National Health and Medical Research Council, 2013)

"Appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthy and nutritionally adequate. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the lifecycle.
Those following a strict vegetarian or vegan diet can meet nutrient requirements as long as energy needs are met and an appropriate variety of plant foods are eaten throughout the day.” (p35)

Eat For Health: Australian Dietary Guidelines (National Health and Medical Research Council, 2013)

"Appropriately planned vegetarian diets, including total vegetarian or vegan diets, are healthy and nutritionally adequate. Well-planned vegetarian diets are appropriate for individuals during all stages of the lifecycle.

Those following a strict vegetarian or vegan diet can meet nutrient requirements as long as energy needs are met and an appropriate variety of plant foods are eaten throughout the day.” (p35)

1 week ago
5 notes | Reblog

Green Smoothie
3 bunches (stalks) english spinach
1 banana
1 passionfruit
5 strawberries
2 ice cubes
small handful mint leaves
1/4 - 1/2 cup soy or other plant milk (optional)
1/4 cup cold water
Pineapple, coconut water, kale, baby spinach, celery and blueberries also work really well in green smoothies. As long as you have banana and a good quality blender you’re pretty much guaranteed a deliciously creamy smooth drink that does not taste ‘green’.
Green smoothies are an excellent way to get easy serves of fruit, vegetables, water and/or milk alternatives into your diet. Smoothies are also better for you than juices because you don’t lose anything, like all the fibre lost when pulp is extracted in juicers.

Green Smoothie

Pineapple, coconut water, kale, baby spinach, celery and blueberries also work really well in green smoothies. As long as you have banana and a good quality blender you’re pretty much guaranteed a deliciously creamy smooth drink that does not taste ‘green’.

Green smoothies are an excellent way to get easy serves of fruit, vegetables, water and/or milk alternatives into your diet. Smoothies are also better for you than juices because you don’t lose anything, like all the fibre lost when pulp is extracted in juicers.

2 weeks ago
18 notes | Reblog

Green Edge Foodgasms

  1. Salad Bowl with Mango Chutney and Guacamole. I requested Deep Fried Tofu as an extra (this is not usually included) and luckily Cale said they could do that because it made the whole meal absolutely perfect. $10
  2. Mushroom, Walnut, and Spinach Risotto. The risotto also has red onion, coconut milk, and truffle oil, and is honestly the most delicious risotto I have ever tasted. $16
  3. Deep Fried Ice Cream! Definitely big enough to share between two or three people. My friend and I had just been to the Kelvin Grove Markets so we supplied our own strawberries. $10
2 weeks ago
5 notes | Reblog

Iron Boost Stir Fry
100g tofu = 7.9mg
1 cup bok choy and 1/2 cup broccoli = 1.1mg
12g or approx. 6 cashews = 0.6mg
1 cup cooked brown rice = 1.0mg
ginger (fresh or powdered), soy sauce, and sesame oil to taste

Total iron content = 10.6mg

*RDI for adult males is 8mg, and 18mg for adult (premenopausal) women. Please note: quantities in image are not all equal to those listed.
Sources:
The Medical Journal of Australia. 2012. Is a vegetarian diet adequate? Concepts and controversies in plant-based nutrition 1(2): 13-14.
nutritiondata.self.com. 2014.

Iron Boost Stir Fry

Total iron content = 10.6mg

*RDI for adult males is 8mg, and 18mg for adult (premenopausal) women. Please note: quantities in image are not all equal to those listed.

Sources:

  1. The Medical Journal of Australia. 2012. Is a vegetarian diet adequate? Concepts and controversies in plant-based nutrition 1(2): 13-14.
  2. nutritiondata.self.com. 2014.
2 weeks ago
20 notes | Reblog

"Globalized industrialized food is not cheap: it is too costly for the Earth, for the farmers, for our health. The Earth can no longer carry the burden of groundwater mining, pesticide pollution, disappearance of species and destabilization of the climate. Farmers can no longer carry the burden of debt, which is inevitable in industrial farming with its high costs of production. It is incapable of producing safe, culturally appropriate, tasty, quality food. And it is incapable of producing enough food for all because it is wasteful of land, water and energy. Industrial agriculture uses ten times more energy than it produces. It is thus ten times less efficient."

-

Vandana Shiva

Support organic, sustainable, planet friendly agriculture as often as you can. It is an investment in your own well being, the well being of the planet, the well being of the farmer, the well being of the bees. It is an investment in our collective future.

3 weeks ago
5 notes | Reblog

Pumpkin, Sage & Mushroom Risotto

Basic risotto ingredients:
2 tbsp olive oil
1 tbsp nuttelex
2 cloves garlic, crushed and diced
1 red onion, diced
1 leek, halved lengthwise and sliced
1 tsp lemon rind, 1/4 cup lemon juice
5 cups (1L) vegetable stock
 1 cup arborio rice
2 tbsp nutritional yeast
3-4 sage leaves
Extra Ingredients:
2-3 cups rocket/baby spinach
1 cup sauteed swiss brown mushroom
1-2 cups sage roasted pumpkin
 1-2 handfuls roasted cashews (or pinenuts)
Turn on the rice cooker and set it to ‘cook’ – you might have to hold the bowl down a bit to stop it flicking up to ‘warm’ until there are enough ingredients weighing it down.
Put olive oil and nuttelex in the rice cooker and leave until the butter melts.
Add the garlic and red onion, saute till soft. Add chopped leeks, saute till soft. 
Add lemon rind and juice, sage, arborio rice and vege stock. Mix well then close the lid. Stir once during cooking.
 Once cooked (rice cooker will flick up to the  ‘warm’ setting) stir through cashews, baby spinach, rocket and nutritional yeast. Then stir through the pumpkin and mushroom, leaving some pieces to garnish on top. 
Add salt and pepper to taste.

Pumpkin, Sage & Mushroom Risotto

Basic risotto ingredients:

Extra Ingredients:

  1. Turn on the rice cooker and set it to ‘cook’ – you might have to hold the bowl down a bit to stop it flicking up to ‘warm’ until there are enough ingredients weighing it down.
  2. Put olive oil and nuttelex in the rice cooker and leave until the butter melts.
  3. Add the garlic and red onion, saute till soft. Add chopped leeks, saute till soft.
  4. Add lemon rind and juice, sage, arborio rice and vege stock. Mix well then close the lid. Stir once during cooking.
  5.  Once cooked (rice cooker will flick up to the  ‘warm’ setting) stir through cashews, baby spinach, rocket and nutritional yeast. Then stir through the pumpkin and mushroom, leaving some pieces to garnish on top.
  6. Add salt and pepper to taste.

3 weeks ago
11 notes | Reblog

Sage Roasted Pumpkin, Potato & Beetroot with Maple Glazed Parsnips

  1. Preheat oven to 180 - 200 C (depending on the reliability of your oven’s heat).
  2. Wash and dry all vegetables, leaving the skin on all of them.
  3. Halve beetroots and cut pumpkin into medium size chunks.
  4. Place beetroot, pumpkin and sage on a lined baking tray. Top each with a small quantity of olive oil and sea salt. This is optional, as they will still roast nicely without any oil.
  5. Roast beetroot and pumpkin for 30 mins.
  6. On a second tray place halved potatoes cut side down (this will ensure you get they go crispy and golden), as well as thick cut lengths of parsnip. (If you want to roast parsnip whole, place them in oven at the same time as your first tray).
  7. Top parsnip and potato with a small amount of olive oil, sea salt, optional garlic and extra sage leaves.
  8. When the beetroot and pumpkin have been roasting for 30 minutes add the tray of parsnip and potato. Roast for another 60 minutes or until vegetables are cooked as desired.
  9. Remove trays from oven and combine cooked parsnips with 1-2 tbsp of maple syrup (100% maple syrup is best). You can coat them in maple syrup before roasting but taste-wise this works just as well. As well as parsnips this is delicious with carrots and/or sweet potato. Add a handful of chopped hazelnuts and walnuts for extra deliciousness.
  10. Serve roast veggies with a lemon dill butter - simply mix nuttelex (or other plant-based butter alternative) with lemon and fresh dill leaves.

Also picture in the bottom photo is the delicious eggplant and zucchini parmigiana my friend Alex made. I will have to ask her for the recipe so that I can share it on here as it is absolutely delicious.

4 weeks ago
5 notes | Reblog

Animals Australia: How to treat a lady right.

4 weeks ago
24 notes | Reblog

"

We are always made to believe in the growth fundamentalism that you’ve got to wipe out other species so that humanity can have more food. The reality is, the more we leave for other species, the more we have ourselves. The more pollinators there are, the more food they give us. The more soil organisms there are, the more food they give us. The more biodiversity-intensive agriculture is and our gardens are, the more food per acre we get.

But this is growth in life, in nutrition, in livelihoods, in creativity. And that is the contest we have right now. The contest between a killing GDP, an anti life GDP; and indicators that would nourish life of all species and humanity.

"

-Vandana Shiva, Festival of Dangerous Ideas 2013: Growth = Poverty
1 month ago
5 notes | Reblog

Thai Style “Chicken” Fried Rice
1 cup Lamyong’s Soy Nuggets, partially defrosted
2 cups cooked brown rice
1 tsp fresh diced or powdered ginger
half a bunch of shallots, sliced (keep some aside to garnish meal)
half to one red chili
2 cups chopped broccoli
2 cups roughly shredded bok choy/choy sum
soy sauce
lemon/lime juice
sesame oil
cooking oil
Heat Lamyong soy nuggets until warmed through, either in microwave or beneath the grill (I no longer have a microwave so I use the grill and it works very well).
Slice nuggets into smaller strips - quartered or into fifths.
Heat oil in a good sized wok, then fry nuggets until slightly browned.
Add soy sauce, enough to coat all pieces.
Add chili, ginger, broccoli and shallots. Stir fry until broccoli is slightly softened. Add soy sauce to taste.
Stir through cooked brown rice, until coated in sauce and ingredients are evenly distributed.
Stir through leafy greens until wilted.
Remove from heat and stir through sesame oil to taste (about 1-2 tsp), and fresh lime juice.
Garnish with raw shallots, chillies and lime wedges.

Thai Style “Chicken” Fried Rice

  1. Heat Lamyong soy nuggets until warmed through, either in microwave or beneath the grill (I no longer have a microwave so I use the grill and it works very well).
  2. Slice nuggets into smaller strips - quartered or into fifths.
  3. Heat oil in a good sized wok, then fry nuggets until slightly browned.
  4. Add soy sauce, enough to coat all pieces.
  5. Add chili, ginger, broccoli and shallots. Stir fry until broccoli is slightly softened. Add soy sauce to taste.
  6. Stir through cooked brown rice, until coated in sauce and ingredients are evenly distributed.
  7. Stir through leafy greens until wilted.
  8. Remove from heat and stir through sesame oil to taste (about 1-2 tsp), and fresh lime juice.
  9. Garnish with raw shallots, chillies and lime wedges.
1 month ago
6 notes | Reblog

Roasted Rosemary Eggplant with Persian Tahdig Rice
I borrowed the roast eggplant recipe from here and the tahdig recipe (rice with fried potato) from here. I additionally added half a tin of lentils to the cook rice, as well as a half tsp of cumin as I do not have any saffron. As you can see I didn’t quite master the tahdig recipe, as most of the potato slices stuck to the pot. Next time I will try cooking for less time and in a better quality non-stick pot.
Served with a dollop of hummus and a simple salad of tomato, red onion, a squeeze of lime and beautifully fragrant organic parsley.

Roasted Rosemary Eggplant with Persian Tahdig Rice

I borrowed the roast eggplant recipe from here and the tahdig recipe (rice with fried potato) from here. I additionally added half a tin of lentils to the cook rice, as well as a half tsp of cumin as I do not have any saffron. As you can see I didn’t quite master the tahdig recipe, as most of the potato slices stuck to the pot. Next time I will try cooking for less time and in a better quality non-stick pot.

Served with a dollop of hummus and a simple salad of tomato, red onion, a squeeze of lime and beautifully fragrant organic parsley.

1 month ago
8 notes | Reblog

The Future of Food, 2004

"The Future of Food distills the complex technology and consumer issues surrounding major changes in the food system today — genetically engineered foods, patenting, and the corporatization of food — into terms the average person can understand. It empowers consumers to realize the consequences of their food choices on our future."

1 month ago
5 notes | Reblog

1/2 size falafel pocket from the Queen St Jan Powers’ Markets - $9
pita pocket
falafel
tabbouleh
tahini sauce
hot chili sauce
red cabbage
shredded lettuce

1/2 size falafel pocket from the Queen St Jan Powers’ Markets - $9

6 months ago
12 notes | Reblog

The Scarecrow is a really cool, eerily beautiful animation by Chipotle that critiques factory farming and the fast-food corporations that support those processes. The use of the song ‘Imagination’ (from Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory) works really well in it. You can view their first ad in a similar vein, ‘Back to the Start’, here.

This article from the Guardian has some interesting comments on their advertising strategy, including the fact that the ad seems to promote vegetarianism whilst Chipotle includes meat in its menu. However, since the meat is more sustainably and ethically sourced than factory farmed processes, is this sort of conversation generating advertising at least a step in the right direction, especially since we have to accept that for the foreseeable future some people will continue to eat animals?

What do you think?

6 months ago
14 notes | Reblog

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